Various Artists – Wild in the Streets Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1968)

A perennial garage band favorite, “The Shape of Things to Come,” originally released by a studio group credited as Max Frost and the Troopers, may be one of the most timeless and prophetic political anthems ever released. Capturing the eternal struggle of the generation gap in the face of revolution and change, the song is as relatable now as when it was releaased in 1968. But who were Max Frost and the Troopers? A look at the origins and continuous importance of “The Shape of Things to Come” and how it took a life of its own beyond the problematic film that introduced it, “Wild in the Streets.”

Cilla Black – Is It Love? (1965)

When Cilla Black’s first US LP, “Is it Love?” was dropped on American soil, it claimed that the British songstress was “England’s Most Popular Solo Singer.” However, unlike many of the other women to come out of the British Invasion, Cilla never hit big in America. But there was two things that she had that the other girls didn’t have – the backing of The Beatles, and the genius of Brian Epstein. A look at Cilla’s place on the Merseybeat scene, her relationship with The Fab Four, the stories behind her biggest hits and the final gift that Brian Epstein left her which turned her into a UK entertainment legend. Extra: Cilla Black’s rivalry with DIonne Warwick!

Cilla Black – The Very Best of Cilla Black (1983)

In true “Surprise Surprise” fashion, British entertainment icon Cilla Black is back as a cultural phenome, now as a popular Tik Tok meme. But, with most of the platform’s user’s watching butchered clips from her Cillagrams, the laughs are on Cilla and not in spite of her. A look at the television career of Cilla Black, and putting some much needed context into “Surprise Surprise,” “Cillagrams” and the origins of these bizarre Cilla Black Tik Tok videos.

Paul McCartney – Give My Regards to Broad Street (1984)

At the age of nine future record collector Sam Tweedle brought a copy of Paul “McCartney’s “Give my Regards to Broad Street” home from a school fun fair which opened the doorway into the music of The Beatles, although he didn’t know it. One music fan’s misstep into the music of McCartney, and a look at his early 1980’s MTV period and his hit single “No More Lonely Nights.” Extra: The importance of McCartney and Michael Jackson’s collaborations on the MTV generation.

Vinyl Stories Interview – Killing Us Softly with His Songs: A Conversation with Charles Fox

In conjunction with the new documentary “Killing Us Softly with His Songs,” Sam Tweedle talks with composer Charles Fox about his unique life in music. Although he has worked in the fields of jazz, classical, opera, film scores and pop music, Charles Fox has made his unique mark on pop culture by co-writing some of the most iconic television theme songs of all time. From the streets of the Bronx to the conservatories of Paris, the Hollywood Hills to the music halls of Cuba, Charles Fox discusses some of the music which has become an important part of our lives.

The Partridge Family – Sound Magazine (1971)

In 2015 Sam Tweedle found long lost fan letter to teen idol David Cassidy from a young girl named Monica. Offering an insight into the real anxieties and thoughts of a young teen fan, Sam shares the letter over fifty years after it was originally written. Bonus: Tiger Beat and 16 Magazine’s battle over David Cassidy coverage, David’s best friend Sam Hyman, that time Laurie got braces, and how YOU can win one of David’s puppies!

The Partridge Family – The Partridge Family Album (1970)

Everybody remembers David Cassidy as the lead singer of The Partridge Family, but who were the other members of the group? A deep dive into The Ron Hicklin Singers – the most famous uncredited singing group of all time. From Gary Lewis and the Playboys to The Monkees and far beyond, the Ron Hicklin Singers created a sound of an entire generation through television, film, radio and commercials, defining the signature sound of the 1960’s and 1970’s pop industry.

Melanie – Candles in the Rain (1970)

This week we said goodbye to the Little Sister of the Sun, Melanie Safka. Sam Tweedle revisits his 2012 interview as Melanie talks about the events that inspired her first Billboard hit “Lay Down (Candles in the Rain).” From her unlikely debut on the Woodstock stage, the collaboration with the Edwin Hawkins Singers that nearly didn’t happen, and the night that the song saved a platoon of men in Viet Nam, Melanie tells the story of “Lay Down” in her own words.

The Love Generation – The Love Generation (1967), A Generation of Love (1968) and Montage (1968)

Made up of hand selected session singers from the 1960’s music scene, The Love Generation was brothers Tom and John Bahler’s attempt to break out in front as a pop act. However, despite some of the best vocal arrangements and harmonies ever recorded in pop music, the band seemed to out of touch for the modern record buyer. Ignored at the time, the Bahler Brothers introduced a sound through The Love Generation that would become recognizable in years to come via their work with major bubblegum acts through the early 1970’s. IThe Love Generation is a band that needs to be rediscovered by autophiles, fans of retro 60’s sounds and bubblegum pop music.

Robert Johnson – King of the Delta Blues Singers Vol. II (1970)

In the 1930’s blues man Robert Johnson travelled through the Mississippi Delta playing juke joints for tips and drinks. Unknown during his lifetime, in death he would become known as the greatest blues man that ever lived. But legend has it that Johnson made a deadly deal with the devil at a crossroads at midnight to gain his mastery of blues guitar, and months before he would have found fame, the devil came for his payment. A look at Robert Johnson’s deal with the devil, and its surprisingly legacy which continues today.

Arthur Brown – The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (1968)

In 1968 performance artist Arthur Brown brought his Faustian nightmare journey through hell to music audiences via his album “The Crazy World of Arthur Brown” and became the godfather of “shock rock.” Through his high pitched wails and the helmet that shot flames from his head, Brown would be considered a “one hit wonder,” but changed the face of rock performance forever. A look at the career of “The God of Hellfire,” the birth of shock rock and Arthur Brown’s continuing influence on the rock n’ roll landscape today.

Paul Williams – Phantom of the Paradise Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1974)

In this world there are “Rocky Horror” people, and there are “Phantom of the Paradise” people. “Rocky Horror” fans seem, for the most part, to be ignorantly unaware of “Phantom of the Paradise,” while “Phantom of the Paradise” fans just simply know which film is better.  A loving look at Paul Williams’ phantastic soundtrack to the 1974 cult film “Phantom of the Paradise.”

Duane Eddy – Have Twangy Guitar, Will Travel (1958)

When Duane Eddy met Lee Hazelwood in 1954 Lee was a country music disc jockey in the small farming community of Coolidge, Arizona and Duane was a high schooler looking to score free records. But pooling together their individual talents, by the end of the decade the pair joined forces and changed the shape of guitar rock with their hit collaboration “Rebel-‘Rouser.” The story of the Duane Eddy and Lee Hazelwood partnership, and its continuing influence on rock n’ roll.

Frank Sinatra – The World We Knew (1967)

In 1967 Frank and Nancy SInatra scored an unlikely hit with “Somethin’ Stupid,” becoming the only father/daughter team to ever reach #1 on the charts. A look at the unique bond between Frank and Nancy, and the historical, albeit it problematic, legacy of the song they recorded together. Extra: In 1998 Sam Tweedle says goodbye to his hero. A look back at the death of Frank Sinatra, and the gift that the Sinatra Family gave to his fans,.

Nancy Sinatra – Boots: Nancy Sinatra’s All-Time Hits (1986)

Despite being remembered as one of the most iconic pop singers of the 1960’s, during her early days in showbusiness Nancy Sinatra was a hard sell. After struggling for years to find a hit, in 1965 Nancy was nearly dropped from Capitol Records roster despite her father being the boss of Reprise Records. Enter a new producer, a new attitude and “So Long, Babe” – the forgotten hit that saved Nancy Sinatra from obscurity. A look at the pitfalls of Nancy Sinatra’s early years in pop music.

Various Artists – Beyond the Valley of the Dolls Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1970)

In 1970 director Russ Meyer introduced a new rock band, The Carrie Nations, to audiences in his film epic “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls.” With music written by Stu Phillips, and featuring the talents of Lynn Carey, The Strawberry Alarmclock, and The Sandpipers, the film contained some of the freshest and most dynamic rock music ever written for a film, reflecting the sounds and attitude of Los Angeles’ Sunset Strip culture. But the music would be ignored by the Billboard charts and barely found an audience while one of the key players was mysteriously missing from the soundtrack album. An introduction to the world of “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls” and the music of The Carrie Nations.

Frank Sinatra – Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980)

In 1980, to celebrate his 40th Anniversary, Frank Sinatra blasted off into outer space for a kooky intergalactic song cycle called “The Future” on his album “Trilogy: Past Present Future.” A divisive recording amongst critics and fans, it’d be the biggest recording session of Sinatra’s career. A look at this bizarre entry into the Sinatra songbook. Extra: The release of “New York, New York” and how it recentered Sinatra’s legacy.

Roy Orbison – At the Rock House (1961)

In 1956 Roy Orbison and his band, The Teen Kings, arrived at Sun Records in Memphis, Tennessee to recut their record “Ooby Dooby.” However, despite being signed by Sam Phillips, Roy would find himself floundering at the legendary label and wouldn’t find chart success until 1961 and at a different label. Why did it take Roy Orbison so long to make it, and how did Sam Phillips allow Roy Orbison to slip through his fingers? A look at Roy Orbison at Sun Records.

Sonny and Cher – The Wondrous World of Sonny and Cher (1966)

After getting thrown out of a Hollywood restaurant in 1965, a fed up Sono Bono wrote an emotional manifesto titled “Laugh at Me,” which became his only hit record, A look at “Laugh at Me,” Sonny’s fight for respect, and why he allowed the laughter to continue through the 1970’s and beyond. Extra: The lasting legacy of Sonny and Cher, and Chaz Bono’s attempt to reinvent “Laugh at Me” as a transgender anthem.

Sonny and Cher – Look at Us (1965)

When Sonny met Cher in 1962, he was a struggling songwriter working as an underdog in Phil Spector’s studio, and she was a teenage runaway with dreams of stardom. Ambitious and in love, the pair spent three years being kicked around the LA scene until 1965, when Inspired by the love that bonded them together, Sonny Bono wrote one of pop musics greatest love songs, “I Got You Babe,” catupultiing them to the top of charts and international stardom. A look at the early days of Sonny and Cher.

Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

When Bob Dylan released his sacond album, “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan,” in 1963, he gained world wide fame for his political writings and anti-war musings. But behind the songs was the influence of his then girlfriend Suze Rotolo, who was immoralized walking with him on the album’s front cover. Who was Suze Rotolo, and how did she help shape the legend that would become Bob Dylan? A look into their relationship and Suze’s important place in the Bob Dylan mythos.

Paul Revere and the Raiders – Something Happening (1968)

Despite being one of the best American bands of the 1960’s, Paul Revere and the Raiders never found the legacy they’ve deserved. Was it the gimmicky costumes, their association with Dick Clark Productions or the animosity between Paul Revere and front man Mark Linsday which prevented them from becoming top tier rock legends? A look at the rise and fall of Paul Revere and the Riaders, and why they need to be rediscovered.

Various Artists – Zabriskie Point Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1970)

Although it was one of the biggest box office bombs of the all time, Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1970 film “Zabriskie Point” spawned one of the best soundtrack albums of the era with original music by The Grateful Dead, The Youngbloods, Kaleidoscope and Pink Floyd. The resu.t was a soundtrack album more culturally relevant and remembered than the film that spawned it. Extra: A brief overview of the lives of the couple on the cover, Mark Frechette and Daria Halprin,.

Bobbie Gentry – The Girl From Chickasaw County (2022)

40 years after her self exile from the music industry, singer/songwriter Bobbie Gentry has finally found appreciation amongst modern music fans. Too honky tonk for rock fans and too progressive for country fans, Bobbie was perhaps too ahead of her time in the 60’s and 70’s, but is finally gaining a modern cult following for her swampy blues-country originals and genre spanning crossover masterpieces. However, while the world finally listens, Bobbie doesn’t want to be found.